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20130228
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> european leaders at loggerheads over the new budget. >> credit unit -- a general strike in tunisia as anger grows over the assassination of one of the nation's boldest critics. >> an unsettling report outlining doping across sports. the battle of the budget in brussels in shaping up to be very much a north/south confrontation with europe's rich northern countries calling for a further deep spending cuts. >> but in the south, countries like greece and spain say four years of austerity are enough. they are calling for spending to be eased to spur growth and create jobs. >> after it failed budget summit in november, stakes are high this time around for some kind of deal. >> british prime minister david cameron wants the eu to mend what he sees as its wasteful ways. he made his point by arriving on foot, not in a chauffeur-driven limousine. he went into the talks in a bullish mood. >> the numbers that were put forward were much too high. they need to come down, and if they do not, a to be a done deal. >> that puts him on a collision course with many other eu leaders who argue the block needs a
in federal prison. in tunisia, new protests broke out in the capital, demanding the end of the government. it was the second day of unrest sparked by the killing of a leading opposition figure. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: in tunis today, crowds converged on the interior ministry on the same spot where the so-called arab spring began two years ago. "the people want the downfall of the regime" the chant once again. but this time the tear gas came from police loyal not to a dictator but to tunisia's democratically elected government, one which now stands accuse of complicity in political assassination. the victim was chokri belaid, shot outside his home yesterday by a gunman on a motorbike. belaid had appeared on television the night before he died. the s.e.c. tar politician told his interview that tunisia's governing islamist party harbored religious factions which incited violence. his killing prompted the biggest explosion of anger since the revolution itself. groups claiming that revolution had been stolen by islamists who w
to build a nuclear weapon. police and tunisia arrested a suspect linked to the murder of an opposition leader. he was shot in front of his home earlier this month. his killing sparked days of unrest and also led to the resignation of the prime minister. details of the arrest are still sketchy but the suspect is believed to be member of a hardline muslim movement. france says it will not negotiate with gunman who are holding a french family hostage and cameron. the group is threatening to kill the family unless the jail the fighters in cameroon and nigeria are freed. the kidnappers clinton departed the nigerian rubble group boko haram. it has become more dangerous for french citizens in certain parts of africa since france intervened in mali. >> it confirms the limitless cruelty of the hostage takers. it carried out the verification process which is necessary with the images. the only thing to be said is to reiterate how shocking images are, the cruelty by the kidnappers and the french government's determination to do everything possible to free them. >> less than a week ago now before
future attacks being planned by the same people because we never got a chance to talk to him. tunisia said their laws would not let them hold him. that is an excuse we've heard in other pats of the world. that doesn't concern you? >> we press our partners in foreign government to hold individuals and to allow us access to it. sometimes their laws do not allow that to happen. i think the united states government has to respect these governments right to, in fact, enforce their laws appropriately. we don't want to have these individuals being held in some kind of custody that is extra judicial. >> thank you. >> senator warner. >> thank you. thank you mr. brennan, for your testimony today. i think what we've heard from a number of colleagues and we had this discussion when we discussed the committee study. how could be confirmed -- i'm-- how do you ensure that the c.i.a. director is going to be well-informed. particularly to -- we have questioned you about a number of key sensitive programs. the agency is in a lot of these programs that there needs to be some ability to measure objective
they did. he is still in tunisia. it shows the two nations are working with the rule of law, just like we do. >> we have someone who is a suspect in the potential attack on benghazi and did not give us access to him, and we don't have any information. >> we work with our partners across the board. when they can detain individuals according to their laws, we were to see if we have the ability to ask some questions, sometimes directly and sometimes indirectly. >> but the tunisian law did not allow them to hold them so they let them go? >> and we did not have anything on him, either. if we did, we would have made the point for them to turn them over to us. the cia should be able to lend its full expertise as it does right now in terms of and support a military interrogations', fbi, and foreign partner of the briefings. they do that on a regular basis. >> what is the best setting? a suspected terrorist is captured and we think we can obtain information from them, where the suggest they be taken? what is the right setting? >> there are many options. sometimes with foreign partners, they put th
there in the world and not all are benghazi or tripoli or tunisia. the reality is in most countries in the world we can rely on the host country to provide security. they are there and willing to do it and they do a good job. there are some of these embassies in some of these more volatile countries that are of concern and those are the 19 that were designated by the state department as ones we had to look at more closely and then try to develop a better approach to providing security, because there, part of the problem is the host countries are not very good in providing that kind of security. >> is there a -- it seems there is so much of a distance and time challenge that when it happens, how quickly can we respond, how far away are we. is there almost like a playbook for ambassadors for the people in those facilities that here's the steps to follow, jump on these immediately. if this doesn't click, we go to this, if this doesn't click, we go to that. >> the best playbook, the best playbook is an ambassador who says we've got serious security problems here. we are threatened and therefore we need
as a difficult, the evolving situation in north africa, now with tunisia, with libya, with all these countries, and certainly with mali, and how you plan to direct the agency to deal with this evolving momentum that is taking place in northern africa. so that will be for tuesday, and at the request of senator levin, i ask for unanimous consent to add into the record a joint statement that he and i made on april 27, 2012, and, secondly, in order to have mr. brennan's answers to questions for the record by the time he returns before us in closed session, i ask members provide questions for the record by 5:00 p.m. tomorrow. that is friday, february 8, so we have them for you as soon as possible. so that you can respond to them. i want to thank you and your family for being here. i wish you well. thank you and the hearing is adjourned. >> thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> we will bring you the farewell ceremony for leon panetta. president obama is expected to speak at that event. live coverage begins at 3:
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)